Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WBW-14- Has the World Gone...

KUKU??
Maybe-
It's been a while since I've seen anything new or different--I usually have to travel for that--but here is a bird that lives right here in SC and is pretty elusive--  I spent hours of my time in the past listening to Birding By Ear and if you haven't taken the plunge yet you should--you know when a song comes on the radio if you've heard it before you can ID the song with only the first few notes played...well birding by ear is like that so you learn the call and you know the bird!! SO that's how I knew what was in the trees and I kept looking until I found it...

The Yellow-Billed Cuckoo- (link to What Bird -check out the tail)


Coccyzus americanus
My photo is not doing this bird justice but he finally came to the wood's edge after I nearly "pished" by brains out..IF only I'd had a screech owl tape (birds will come to investigate a screech owl, a trick I learned from my birding club) I kept hoping he would turn around so I could get a shot of the under tail...to me the tail is what really makes this bird a beauty--(the females are larger but other than that the same) These birds are arboreal and hard to spot...so learning the call is the key to seeing one in the wilds..they range/breed all over the US from Canada to Mexico.  IF You want to hear the call Click Here



So that's my WBW contribution for this week....I hope you will take the time to go listen to the call and consider learning bird calls--its a great edition to birding--You can stand in the busy forest, close your eyes, and single out all those birds just by sound--

Go here to see more Awesome Birds of the World-and show your support of Springman's efforts to enlighten more people to the wonderful world around us!

27 comments:

  1. Couldn't agree more; birding is as important with our ears, as it is with our eyes.
    A great way to find some of the more elusive birds.
    He's a fine looking bird :)

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  2. Never seen one up here, but I hope that changes. Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  3. Difficult to do when your area is awash with helicopters, and flying fuel tankers, as is ours, even in the middle of nowhere.
    I can tell a garbage truck from a delivery van, but that doesn't help much:-)
    BTW, does this cuckoo follow normal cuckoo behaviour? Dumping its eggs in 0ther nests I mean.

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  4. A totally different call to our migrant Cuckoo. I would be lost without my ears as I hear far more species than I see.

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  5. That's one bird I'd love to see! Nice shots!

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  6. Unfortunately with my one deaf ear I am like a top trying to track bird calls, just spinning around. Every bird sounds like its coming from my right side! The tip about the owl call is intriguing. The things you learn here!

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  7. Nature watching is more about hearing before seeing in so many situations. I do my wildlife walks alone just for the silence. A beautiful bird and so different from our Cuckoo that is currently in Africa and will arrive in the UK to breed in late April.

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  8. Great post on the Yellow billed Cuckoo. I love to hear these birds while walking in the woods next to my house. Great shots.

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  9. What a fascinating chap!
    Congrats on catching this elusive fellow at all and good for you to spend all those hours listening ;)

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  10. Yes I did read they will parasitise a nest--

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  11. Well, I know when it's a bird I hear as opposed to something else, does that count? LOL

    I can't get the hang of identifying them! Much less adding sounds. Of course, you now have me intrigued thinking I can flush a new species out of the woods.

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  12. Your profile reads so much like mine but in the east.

    The bird was a good find. I really need to learn more bird songs.

    Glad you stopped by.

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  13. Nice! So glad he let you get some photos - i've always had a hard time with them sitting still for me. nice photos :)

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  14. What a great sighting and photos (even without the tail)! Dang...I can't wait to retire so I can devote my time to learning more of the songs and calls of the birds in my area. Now I want a CD featuring a Screech Owl. Thanks for the tip!

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  15. Well spotted. Yes I too have hhunted a bird for hours/days until I could finally spot and identify it. The birdcall identification is very handy, I wish we had such a tape for Australia as well.

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  16. Hi - I spent hours just looking into trees trying to see Green Cat Birds a few months ago - I thought my neck was going to snap!

    Saw it in the end, but no photos - your post made me think about that!

    Heres to ears!

    Stewart M - Australia

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  17. Sondra -- that is one cuckoo post girl! I think your shots are great -- we've seen this bird (Pre-digital) but I'm sure if I'd been able to try my pix wouldn't have turned out this well -- I'd love to have the opportunity to try tho.
    Tx for sharing -- and I loved what you said about WBW -- I love this meme too.

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  18. I stalk birds with unusal calls too till I find out what they are.Great photos!I did not know that about the owl,good to know,always learning something,phylliso

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  19. really cool find! such an interesting bird!

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  20. I listened to the call and it is really special. I still have a lot to learn about the calls of our birds.

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  21. Did you participate in the Backyard Bird Count by Cornell? If not you can still see lists and numbers for your area. At one feeder station I saw 211 birds and 10 species in 15 minutes. I like to keep a species count when I camp or travel.

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  22. Great find Sondra! You got some nice shots there of a difficult bird to see. The call is very distinctive and a huge help in location. I think we often hear birds before seeing them and to learn their songs is a super important aspect of birding.

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  23. Well spotted, lucky you! :-)

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  24. Oh how exciting for you!!! It would be a lifer for me. I am always so pleased when I learn a new bird by ear. I'm slow! It takes me awhile. ~karen

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